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Baseball To Start Testing For HGH In 2013; Is It Too Little, Too Late?

By Matt Loede - 92.3 The Fan's Indians Beat Reporter
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Barry Bonds / (Photo by Brian Bahr/Getty Images)

Barry Bonds / (Photo by Brian Bahr/Getty Images)

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CLEVELAND (92.3 The Fan) – A day after voters made a statement against baseball players playing in the “steroid era” by choosing no new members into the Baseball Hall of Fame, today MLB made a rather interesting announcement.

Jon Heyman of CBS Sports tweets that MLB will be putting in place testing on a random basis for HGH (Human Growth Hormone).

If the agreement winds up being put in place, Major League Baseball will be the first major sport in the United States to test for HGH.

Many people seem to feel that Major League Baseball turned a blind eye to players that may have been using HGH during the years when home runs and hitting as a whole were on the rise.

It became commonplace to see players who before may have only had career highs in home runs in the teens hit 30-40 homers a season, and many now feel without a doubt those players cheated their way to those numbers.

Then of course there were the former players that seemed to glee in the fact that players like Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens, two players accused of using substances to be better in their time, were not voted into the Hall.

“If they let these guys in ever — at any point — it’s a big black eye for the Hall and for baseball,” relief pitcher Goose Gossage said in a phone interview with The Associated Press. “It’s like telling our kids you can cheat, you can do whatever you want, and it’s not going to matter.”

Now with the ruling on random HGH testing, it seems like Major League Baseball is trying to prevent any such issues in the future.

Then again, who knows if the system of the testing itself is going to be good enough to keep players from cheating their way to bigger, better numbers down the road.

In the end, it appears players like Bonds, Clemens and Sammy Sosa are all going to have to pay the price for MLB choosing to ignore that a LOT of players in that time were cheating.

Bonds received just 36.2 percent of the vote and Clemens 37.6 in totals announced Wednesday, well short of the 75 percent needed for election. Sosa, eighth on the career home run list, got 12.5 percent.

The announcement Thursday may have baseball heading in the right direction, it’s just a shame that the game and the cheating that clearly has been going on for years was ignored in the first place.

Follow @Loede923TheFAN

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