For many, the love of comics and graphic novels has not dimmed at all for decades. So where do you go to find back issues as well as the newest books on Wednesdays (new comic day)? The following Cleveland shops will help you whether you’re a beginning or seasoned collector or just someone who likes a good read.

Kidsforce Collectables; Photo Credit: Mark Horning


Kidforce Collectibles
103 Front St.
Berea, OH 44017
(440) 239-7777
www.facebook.com/kidforce

Along with the 20,000 comics in stock, Kidsforce Collectibles also provides subscription service with discounts plus first dibs on Variance Covers, back stock on graphic novels along with back issues on comics.  The collection of gaming cards is massive, and the store is chock full of new and vintage toys.  In the basement, there is a gaming room for board game enthusiasts, role playing games, etc. There is also a selection of games that you can use for free.  Sprinkled throughout the store are 20 pinball machines where four times a year the store hosts leagues (in fact its 100 player league is the largest in the country). Along with Free Comic Book Day in May, the store also hosts Halloween Comic Fest the Saturday following the holiday where trick or treaters get a free issue just for stopping by.

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Big Fun Toy Store
1814 Coventry Road
Cleveland, OH 44118
(216) 371-4386
www.bigfuntoystore.com

Voted one of the 29th coolest stores in America by Playboy.com as well best toy store in Cleveland by just about everybody, Big Fun Toy Store is for sure one place you have to check out! Thousands of comic books on hand plus a gazillion collectibles make Big Fun Toy Store the one stop store for gifts. With a knowledgeable staff, the store specializes in matching the perfect item by generation and taste. The store offers fun stuff from 25 cents to $50 (with some hard to finds at $200); it is a challenge to walk out of the store without purchasing something. On your next trip to University Circle, stop by and check it out.

Carol & John’s Comic Shop; Photo Credit: Mark Horning


Carol & John’s Comic Shop
17462 Lorain Ave.
Cleveland, OH 44111
(216) 252-0606
www.cnjcomics.com/site

This shop got its start 25 years ago when Carol (the mom) and John (the son) went into business together. Tucked in the corner of Kamm’s Corners Plaza, the shop prides itself in being gender friendly to all, as well as being a pop culture community center. The shop also prides itself in its ability to sell stories rather than collectibles, and with a quarter million titles to choose from, chances are you will find something you like. Over the course of the year, the store also puts together quite a few fundraisers for various community organizations.

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Imaginary World’s Comics
13446 Cedar Road
Cleveland Heights, OH 44118
(216) 273-7423
www.facebook.com/iwcomics

Whether you are a serious comic book collector or a new customer looking for a great story to read, this shop is serious about helping you.  Everyone on staff is a collector who has had good and bad experiences growing up in comic book stores, and all strive to make this store the best.  The store specializes in comic books and graphic novels only. The store keeps 360,000 titles on hand, with 120 more from the big names to independents hitting the stands each week. Imaginary World’s Comics also hosts Ladies Night as a fund raiser to benefit local women shelters.

B & L Comics
5591 Ridge Road
Cleveland, OH 44129
(440) 886-3077
www.facebook.com/BLComics

Stepping into B & L Comics is a trip back to the ’80s.  The store has been in the same location for 32 years, making it one of the oldest in Cleveland (and little has changed since its opening). This is a back issue store for the serious reader who just happens to cater to kids of all ages.  Along with comic books, you will find trading and gaming cards as well as supplies to safely store your collection.

Mark Horning is a freelance writer covering all things Cleveland. His work can be found on Examiner.com.

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